Down the TBR Hole #12

Hello readers!

I remembered to do this tag in time! So yay for that. I have been pretty obsessed with yet another show but that’s slowing down a little bit so good news on that front. It just probably means I will be starting another show on my list. I have a vague list that I keep adding onto, just like my TBR.

The Creator and the Rules

This was created by Lia @ Lost in a Story — she has a new blog though called Sunflowers and Wonder!

  1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf
  2. Order on ascending date added.
  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  4. Read the synopses of the books.
  5. Decide: keep it or should it go?
  6. Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!
 

Book #1

Sophocles II: Ajax / Women of Trachis / Electra / Philoctetes (Complete Greek Tragedies, #4)

“These authoritative translations consign all other complete collections to the wastebasket.”Robert Brustein, The New Republic

“This is it. No qualifications. Go out and buy it everybody.”Kenneth Rexroth, The Nation

“The translations deliberately avoid the highly wrought and affectedly poetic; their idiom is contemporary….They have life and speed and suppleness of phrase.”Times Education Supplement

“These translations belong to our time. A keen poetic sensibility repeatedly quickens them; and without this inner fire the most academically flawless rendering is dead.”Warren D. Anderson, American Oxonian

“The critical commentaries and the versions themselves…are fresh, unpretentious, above all, functional.”Commonweal

“Grene is one of the great translators.”Conor Cruise O’Brien, London Sunday Times

“Richmond Lattimore is that rara avis in our age, the classical scholar who is at the same time an accomplished poet.”Dudley Fitts, New York Times Book Review

Verdict: Keep!

I mean. It’s Sophocles. I want to read it. I have even read a few pages of it. Just didn’t finish it which is my bad.

 Book #2

The Diviners by Libba Bray

Something dark and evil has awakened…

Evie O’Neill has been exiled from her boring old hometown and shipped off to the bustling streets of New York City—and she is pos-i-tute-ly ecstatic. It’s 1926, and New York is filled with speakeasies, Ziegfeld girls, and rakish pickpockets. The only catch is that she has to live with her uncle Will and his unhealthy obsession with the occult.

Evie worries he’ll discover her darkest secret: a supernatural power that has only brought her trouble so far. But when the police find a murdered girl branded with a cryptic symbol and Will is called to the scene, Evie realizes her gift could help catch a serial killer.

As Evie jumps headlong into a dance with a murderer, other stories unfold in the city that never sleeps. A young man named Memphis is caught between two worlds. A chorus girl named Theta is running from her past. A student named Jericho hides a shocking secret. And unknown to all, something dark and evil has awakened…

Verdict: Keep!

If I remember it correctly, this series is now finished? I also have an e-book of this lying around on my iPad. So, I am clearly going to read it. When? You ask. I have no idea. But! It’s like four books? So maybe next year?

Book #3

The Charioteer by Mary Renault

After enduring an injury at Dunkirk during World War II, Laurie Odell is sent to a rural veterans’ hospital in England to convalesce. There he befriends the young, bright Andrew, a conscientious objector serving as an orderly. As they find solace and companionship together in the idyllic surroundings of the hospital, their friendship blooms into a discreet, chaste romance. Then one day, Ralph Lanyon, a mentor from Laurie’s schoolboy days, suddenly reappears in Laurie’s life, and draws him into a tight-knit social circle of world-weary gay men. Laurie is forced to choose between the sweet ideals of innocence and the distinct pleasures of experience.

Originally published in the United States in 1959, The Charioteer is a bold, unapologetic portrayal of male homosexuality during World War II that stands with Gore Vidal’s The City and the Pillar and Christopher Isherwood’s Berlin Stories as a monumental work in gay literature.

Verdict: Remove

Even though I am still interested in reading this, I really need to focus on the books I actually have. So for now, this will go. Who knows, at some point, I might even have this book in my hands and end up reading.

Book #4

The Vintner’s Luck by Elizabeth Knox

One summer night in 1808, Sobran Jodeau sets out to drown his love sorrows in his family’s vineyard when he stumbles on an angel. Once he gets over his shock, Sobran decides that Xas, the male angel, is his guardian sent to counsel him on everything from marriage to wine production. But Xas turns out to be a far more mysterious character. Compelling and erotic, The Vintner’s Luck explores a decidedly unorthodox love story as Sobran eventually comes to love and be loved by both Xas and the young Countess de Valday, his friend and employer at the neighboring chateau.

Verdict: Remove

As with the previous one, I am still interested but I simply have no idea when I will actually get the book and read it. So, it will go for now. Maybe I will be making a maybe list on Goodreads, that might work.

Book #5

Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kristin Cronn-Mills

“This is Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, on community radio 90.3, KZUK. I’m Gabe. Welcome to my show.”

My birth name is Elizabeth, but I’m a guy. Gabe. My parents think I’ve gone crazy and the rest of the world is happy to agree with them, but I know I’m right. I’ve been a boy my whole life.

When you think about it, I’m like a record. Elizabeth is my A side, the song everybody knows, and Gabe is my B side–not heard as often, but just as good.

It’s time to let my B side play.

Verdict: Remove

I don’t remember adding this at all and even though it sounds like it could be good, I am not too sure about it. So it has to go.

 

Books Removed in this Post: 3/ 5

Total Books Removed: 24/ 394

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